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Research — Hydrogeology

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There are 10 projects that match your criteria:
Pecos Valley Water Data Pilot Project
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As part of the New Mexico Water Data Initiative, this 3-year project, cooperatively funded with the US Bureau of Reclamation's WaterSMART program, will improve water data accessiblity, efficiency of data collection and sharing, as well as developing tools to help address water management in the Pecos Valley region of southeastern New Mexico.

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Southern Taos Valley Hydrogeology
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The southern Taos Valley, located southwest of the town of Taos, has been experiencing high growth over the last few decades. In order to address growing water needs in this region, Peggy Johnson, Dr. Paul Bauer, and Brigitte Felix, completed a technical report summarizing the local geology and hydrogeology. Data gathered for this study include geologic maps, well records, new groundwater level measurements and water quality samples, which were compiled with historical data and records. This research describes the important hydrostratigraphic units and aquifers in the region along with geologic/structural controls on groundwater flow. Observations of groundwater flow directions, changes in groundwater levels, distinct water quality and groundwater ages reflect the complex network of faults in the study area and its effects on groundwater.

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Hydrogeologic Study of the Plains of San Agustin and the Alamosa Creek Valley
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Since 2007, the sparsely populated San Agustin Plains has been a controversial basin: a company applied for a permit to pump 54,000 acre-feet per year and to pipe that water to a region outside of the Plains. In 2009, the neighboring watershed to the south, Alamosa Creek — the only perennial stream in the region — faced similar pressure with a mining company exploring for beryllium. In response to these pressures and questions about the hydrogeology of this area, the NM Bureau of Geology began an integrated geologic and hydrologic study of the basins in 2009.

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Overview of Fresh and Brackish Water Quality - High Plains Aquifer
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The High Plains aquifer is one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world, covering more than 170,000 square miles and extending across parts of eight states from South Dakota to the Texas Panhandle (Sophocleous, 2010). The first regional investigation of the High Plains was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey at the beginning of the 20th century (Johnson, 1901). Since then, several regional studies have been conducted (e.g., Gutentag et al., 1984; Weeks et al., 1988), and a great many more localized investigations (e.g., Joeckel et al., 2014; Chaudhuri and Ale, 2014), reflecting the societal and economic importance of this very extensive aquifer system.

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Hydrogeologic investigation of the Arroyo Hondo Area, Taos County, New Mexico
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The Arroyo Hondo ground water study reveals a complex, three-dimensional ground water system with multiple hydrostratigraphic units and aquifers. Distribution of the geologic and hydrostratigraphic units is presented through geologic maps and seven detailed cross sections that depict the distribution of geologic and hydrostratigraphic units, well data, surface water features, water levels, faults, and zones of fracturing and sediment layers in volcanic rocks. Cross sections are constructed both parallel and perpendicular to regional ground water flow and illustrate aquifers in the context of the geologic framework, the Rio Grande and the Rio Hondo, local acequias and other surface water features.

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Hydrogeology of the CuatrociƩnegas Gypsum Dune Field, Coahuila, Mexico
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The gypsum dune deposits found at Cuatrociénegas and White Sands National Monument are two of only a handful of gypsum dune fields in the world. These surreal landscapes provide beautiful views and outdoor activities for tourists and serve as natural laboratories where researchers can study a variety of topics ranging from geology to evolutionary biology. Combined, both Cuatrociénegas and White Sands National Monument are home to more than 110 endemic species, specially adapted to the unique and fragile ecosystems of these gypsum rich environments.

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Hydrologic Assessment of the San Juan Basin
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The San Juan Basin, an important source of oil and gas located in northwestern New Mexico, has recently experienced renewed production from the Cretaceous Mancos Shale through the use of horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing. The Bureau of Land Management commissioned this study of the possible impacts of new exploration and development of this resource on the land surface and on the groundwater supply.

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Geology and hydrogeology of the Arroyo Seco Area, Taos County, New Mexico
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This report describes the geology and hydrogeology of the southwestern Arroyo Seco quadrangle in Taos County, New Mexico. This area is approximately eight miles north of the Town of Taos and is undergoing extensive residential development. The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) Hydrology Bureau has identified a need for more detailed hydrogeologic information to improve the NMOSE groundwater simulation model. To this end, I compiled existing geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical data, performed new geologic mapping, and measured water levels in 43 domestic wells. The synthesis of these data leads to an improved understanding of the distribution and flow patterns of groundwater in the area and the relation of groundwater to surface water, in addition to clarifying the geologic controls on the groundwater system.

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Northeastern Tularosa Basin Regional Hydrogeology Study

The population centers in Alamogordo, Carrizozo, La Luz, and numerous other small communities, are largely supported by groundwater resources. With few perennial streams in this closed basin, water is sparse. Fresh water resources are limited, and recharge to these areas originates within the high elevation watersheds in the Sacramento Mountains, as precipitation, stream and spring flow. This goal of this study was to improve understanding of the groundwater resources in this region by identifying recharge areas and quantities, determining groundwater flow rates and direction, and to interpret the groundwater/surface water interactions that exist in the region. Methods used in this effort included geologic mapping, groundwater level measurements, and geochemical analyses of the groundwater, springs and streams.

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Hydrogeologic investigation of the northern Taos Plateau, Taos County, New Mexico
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The Taos Plateau in northern Taos County is a high-elevation, basalt-capped plain that lies between the Rio Grande and the Tusas Mountains. The plateau overlaps the New Mexico-Colorado border and forms the west rim of the Rio Grande gorge. The hydrogeologic field investigation of the northern Taos Plateau, conducted between October 2007 and October 2009, is the first comprehensive assessment of groundwater conditions on the Taos Plateau and interactions between local aquifers and the Rio Grande. The investigative approach integrates new and existing geologic, geophysical, hydrologic, and geochemical data. This study has been undertaken in parallel with a major investigation of the springs in the Rio Grande gorge (Bauer et al., 2007). These studies advance understanding of the groundwater system in the northern Taos Plateau, and the interconnection of groundwater and surface water along the Rio Grande in northern Taos County.

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